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Research

EIWR facilitates and conducts research aimed at addressing water related developmental problems in Ethiopia through community engagement and student thesis advising by prominent U.S. and Ethiopian professors; we collect and process data at the national and regional level to support research projects via instrumentation of sites, field campaigns, and satellite datasets; and we work with scientist at Addis Ababa University and others to develop innovative technologies to improved access to water for Ethiopians.  There exists a growing understanding on the need for an enhanced engagement of the private sector in order to facilitate the development and use of affordable technologies to address critical water access issues.

PhD Students Present their Research at EIWR’s First Annual Symposium

Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) organized its 1st annual symposium with a theme Water Resources Management” on August 29 and 30, 2014 at Akaki Campus. presenter

On the symposium senior professionals, researchers and EIWR PhD students presented their research papers.  The event provides students the opportunity of presenting their research work in the form of talks and poster presentations. Among PhD students as well as guests the annual symposium is highly accepted, which is attributed to the unconstrained atmosphere. PhD students exchange experiences and knowledge with other professionals with different background. Click hear for more information 

 

 

 

Research Laboratories and Data Collection: Blue Nile Rain Gauge Network:

 In 2012, EIWR installed 60 tipping-bucket ran gauges and five automatic weather stations across the Blue Nile basin from which staff and students collect data every six months  These stations generate reliable information on rainfall characteristics over the complex terrain in that region.  The collected data are very important to teachers as a supporting material and are often used for research.  Three graduate students recently conducted research using the weather data on the following topics.

  1. “Effect of Topography in Satellite Rainfall Estimation Errors: Observational Evidence across Contrasting Elevation in the Blue Nile Basin.” By: Gebrehiwot Niguse
  2. “Effect of Topography on Rainy Season Rainfall Variability over the Blue Nile River Basin, Ethiopia.” By: Shambel Habte
  3. “Spatial and Temporal Rainfall Variability and its Effect on Stream Flow: The Case of Birr Watershed.” By: Nebyou Solomon

 

Innovative Technologies: De-fluoridation in Kori

 Through a University/Private partnership, EIWR has facilitated the design and production of a  replicable de-fluoridation vessel  that is being developed and tested on the ground in collaboration with the Afar Regional State.  In Afar, despite the availability of a huge ground water potential, and increasing investments the ground water quality of various parts of the region is found to be highly affected with natural or geo-genic contaminants, specifically high level of dissolved fluoride.  Consequently, there exists a critical need to adapt standard community level de‐fluoridation technologies and practices that suites to the local societal and economic conditions in Ethiopia.

 The focus of this university-private sector-community partnership engagement lies on carrying out a synthesis of existing and previous efforts and developing more sustainable and affordable design, production and marketing options as well as community empowerment solutions, so that development goals can become a reality.

 

Research: Seminar Presented at CADSWES, Boulder, Colorado by EIWR Graduate Student

Elias Tedla Shiferaw presented his research titled “Multi-Reservoir Operation Optimization under Different Climatic Scenarios to Maximize Energy Production Efficiency” at Center for Advanced Decision Support for Water and Environmental Systems (CADSWES), University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA on April 3, 2014. 
eliasElias recently completed a six month visit to Boulder where he analyzed climate data at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Understanding how to use  water resources in a sustainable manner and projecting precipitation patterns under different climate scenarios can assist planners on  how to mitigate and adapt to the multi-dimensional impacts of climate change.  Omo-Gibe River basin is one of the areas with the highest potential for socio-economic development due to the tremendous potential for hydropower and irrigation.  However, in recent years, climate variations have induced hydrological variability posing a challenge for decision-makers on how best to plan, design and operate hydropower plants.  Hence, there is a need for better models to forecast which systems can lead to a sustainable and optimal power generation.

The main goal of this study was to synthesize and understand future water resources distribution over space and time, and the extent of climate change induced hydrological variability and its impact on the generation capacity of the cascade hydropower plants in the Omo-Gibe River Basin. An attempt has been made to collate historical and future projected climate data under different climatic scenarios from different sources. After applying climate, hydrological and hydropower modelling on the Omo-Gibe River basin with a catchment area of 79,000km2, results showed there is considerable hydrological variability over space and time which can influence long term investment and the generation capacity of cascade hydropower plants across the basin.